fastcompany:

According to Unroll.me, of 2.5 million unsubscribed emails, consumers were most displeased with emails from 1-800 Flowers, unsubscribing at a 52.5% rate, followed by spam from Ticketweb, which had a 47.5% unsubscribe rate.

  1. 1-800 Flowers: 52.50% unsubscribe rate
  2. Ticketweb: 47.50% unsubscribe rate
  3. Pro Flowers: 45.10% unsubscribe rate
  4. Expedia: 45.00% unsubscribe rate
  5. Active.com: 44.70% unsubscribe rate

Here are the other emails we hated getting

Want to learn how to do email marketing the right way - see what the companies in the “roll up” category are doing.

The Unified Device

One day we’ll all be using a single device as a phone, tablet, and desktop. Unfortunately, the hardware and software required to make this a reality hasn’t happened yet. All the pieces are there (touchscreens, powerful mobile processors, etc.) but nobody has figured how to piece it all together.

Who will be the first company to come up with a unified operating system that works consistently across devices?

Microsoft

They made an attempt with Windows 8, but it feels like a prototype with a lot of Windows 7 baggage. Furthermore, none of their phones use this OS. It’s rumored that Windows 9 will attempt to tackle this challenge once again.

Microsoft has enough desktop users that they can win over more smartphone/tablet users - if they can design the right user interface.

Canonical/Ubuntu

In the open source world a lot is being done to unify the desktop and mobile experience. Canonical is reportedly working on a new version of it’s OS that would turn your Android phone into a fully functional desktop when docked. This functionality is only available to OEMs and developers right now, and only works on a few devices.

Unfortunately, Ubuntu is not on most people’s radar. It’s still mostly relegated to developers and system administrators.

Apple

Nobody really knows what Apple is up to. There were rumors about OS X and iOS adapting similar features a few years ago, but the only common links between these two operating systems in 2014 is iCloud and the App/iTunes Store.

Apple has also said repeatedly that they don’t think a touch interface belongs on the desktop. I think they’re completely wrong about this.

Now that the latest iPhone can run 64 bit applications, we could see a lot more innovation from Apple over the next few years. But Apple tends to release minor improvements year over year to their existing product portfolio. They haven’t released a game-changing product since Steve Jobs passed away in 2011.

Google

Google has Android and Chrome OS (linux-based). Both are great operating systems, but offer a completely different user and developer experience and ecosystem. With Chrome OS and Android OS selling so well in their respective categories, it’s hard to predict how these two operating systems may converge.

I can see Google being the first company to pull this off. They understand the cloud better than anybody else. They also innovate and iterate faster than anybody else.

If Google can successfully merge these two platforms everybody else could be left in the dust.

Tablet/PC Hybrids in 2014

2014 is going to be an interesting year for the hybrid tablet/pc. Asus, HP, and Dell have all launched multi-function hybrids that run Windows 8, Android, or both.

2014 will be the year of the tablet/pc hybrid. Consumers will flock to these devices when they discover the utility and fun of a hybrid.

Will 2015 bring us the unified device and operating system? I hope so, but our imaginations move much faster than reality. I think we’re another two years out from seeing a decent prototype, and another five years from widespread consumer adoption.

wired:

The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.
The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.
Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.
With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.
[MORE: The Bitcoin Survival Guide - Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money]

wired:

The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.

The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.

Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.

With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.

[MORE: The Bitcoin Survival Guide - Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money]

Google vs. Apple - 2014 Edition

It’s funny how history repeats itself. Back in the 80’s Apple was innovating and building better products than other PC manufacturers. They had decent market share, but as PC clones and Microsoft improved, and prices came down, Apple lost most of the market. When Steve Jobs was fired Apple’s decent accelerated.

Fast forward to 2014, and a similar scenario between is playing out between Google and Apple in mobile. Apple set the world on fire with their mobile products in 2007 with the release of the iPhone, and again in 2010 with the release of the iPad.

Now Google and Android phone makers are doing the same thing to Apple in mobile. The quality gap is nearly bridged, and Android’s price points are much more affordable. Apple’s decline in mobile and tablet marketshare has happened just as quickly as their decline in the PC market. Unfortunately, there won’t be a Steve Jobs comeback this time around.

As an Apple Fanboy, I hope they can continue to compete as a top player in mobile. Somebody needs to keep Google in check.

Remember what happened when Microsoft claimed 90% of the market There was a lack of innovation and quality for nearly a decade as the market stagnated with no real competition.

One of the key reasons mobile has advanced at a breakneck pace is because two heavyweights are battling it out for marketshare. Once one of those heavyweights falls, the last guy standing will get fat and lazy, and consumers will lose.